Stollen bread

Weihnachtsstollen is a traditional German fruit bread that has become one of my favorite Christmas traditions. The Wisconsin Electric Power Company would publish an annual holiday cookbook. This recipe was from their 1966 edition.

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Stollen dates back to the 14th century when Germans baked loaves at Christmas to honor princes and church dignitaries, and to sell at fairs and festivals for holiday celebrations. It can be enjoyed at anytime of day!

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Serving Size: 3 stollen loaves

Ingredients

  • 2 packages active dry yeast or 1 oz. compressed yeast
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 1 1/2 cups milk
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons salt
  • 3/4 cup butter
  • 2 cups sifted all-purpose flour
  • 3 eggs, beaten
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cardamom
  • 1/2 cup seedless dark raisins
  • 1/2 cup diced dried cherries
  • 1/2 cup diced dried apricots
  • About 4 cups sifted all-purpose flour
  • Melted butter

Directions

Soften active dry yeast in warm water or compressed yeast in lukewarm water. Scald milk; stir in sugar, salt and butter; cool to lukewarm.

Stir in 2 cups flour, yeast, eggs and cardamom; mix in fruit and enough remaining flour to make a stiff dough.

Knead on floured surface; place in greased bowl; grease top of dough; cover and let rise until doubled. Punch dough down; cover; let rest 10 minutes.

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Divide into three equal parts. Shape each piece into an 8 x 10 inch oval; fold lengthwise and place in greased shallow pans.

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Let rise until doubled and bake at 350 degrees about 30 minutes. Frost and decorate if desired.

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Contributor: Elaine Woods

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